Month: July 2013

(Almost) Dairy Free Lasagna

I wanted to make some lasagna last week, but I just can’t eat ricotta, mozarella or any dairy to speak of.  I decided to set out and try to adapt a recipe using cashew cream as my “ricotta” replacement.  I used pasta that was fresh (no, I didn’t make it, I got it in the refrigerated section at my local organic store), made my own sauce, and added veggies to make it really healthy.  Yes, this is not carb free, but for when you want something with pasta, this is pretty awesome!  You can get really strict and leave out the parmesan, and then it would be totally dairy free. My husband, Doubting Thomas that he is (he should trust me by now, we rarely throw anything I concoct out!) said (insert skeptical and unhappy tone of voice here) “Cashew cream in lasagna?  ewwwww, uck”.  Needless to say, he was not only amazed, but gobbled this up.  And pronounced me a genius.  So, I guess that is praise enough to post it on this blog! …

Middle Eastern “Sliders” with Sumac Onions

This is a really fun and very healthy “take” on the American slider – a tiny fat and carb heavy cheesburger that many restaurants have.  I’ve adapted this recipe from the cookbook “Orient Express” by Silvena Rowe.  She used veal, I use only grass fed ground beef and made some modifications. Middle Eastern Sliders These mini burgers are cooked and placed atop rounds of pita or naan bread. If you’re gluten free, use rounds of GF bread.  Topped with sumac onions, they are a fabulous taste variation on our old hamburger.  Make them healthy by using grass fed beef.  (why?  read why here)  Yes, it is more expensive, but the health benefits are worth it –  you are worth it! Ingredients Sumac Onion Topping 1-2 large sweet yellow onions sliced (if very large, use 1 onion) 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 teaspoon ground sumac* Burger Filling 1 lb. grass fed ground beef (if you aren’t using grass fed, be sure it is lean) 1 egg 1 heaping teaspoon grated fresh ginger (I buy it in …

Do you judge yourself or others who are overweight?

Don’t…  you may have it ALL WRONG. I have long been a fan of the TED talks.  Often enlightening, and usually entertaining, these videos should be standard in many college level programs.  It’s a way to educate yourself, entertain yourself and empower yourself.  There is one that is SO important, I’m embedding it here.  It is 15 minutes long. Peter Attia, M.D., trained as a surgeon.  He realized he judged his overweight patients, but had an epiphany when he himself gained weight and developed metabolic syndrome. What he has to say is so important, everyone needs to hear it.   Anyone who has been overweight knows only too well the psychic pain, the emotional pain of being judged.  My entire hypothesis and the reason I do this blog is that I believe IT IS NOT YOUR FAULT.  Peter Attia, you are my hero today because of your courage to question the status quo, and your commitment to address this issue by finding an answer to your questions.   For more on Dr. Attia’s work, see:  eatingacademy.com

Cashew Cream

What the heck is cashew cream?  It’s a great dairy free alternative to cream in recipes, and it can take on many flavors, making it versatile for both savory and sweet recipes.  Yes, it has fat, but it is the good kind of fat.  I’ll put the recipe to make it below, and then give you some serving suggestions for using it in cooking.  It requires NO cooking and all you need is a good blender. To make Cashew Cream: Cashew cream is an amazing “Blank Slate” that makes whatever you add to it creamier and richer.  I use it as a base to convert many recipes to  dairy-free.  It’s much richer and thicker than soy or almond milk. Here’s how to make a homemade vegan cashew cream. As long as you use raw cashews, this even looks similar to sour cream. (Just a bit more beige).  If you want to replicate cream cheese, use less water when you “blenderize” the soaked nuts. Now, if you’re reading this fast, I will say it again: “If …

A calorie is not just a calorie…

Scientific research concludes there are real health benefits to low Glycemic Index/Load (GI/GL) diets.  After reviewing all the latest research on glycemic index, glycemic load and glycemic response, an international committee of leading nutrition scientists have released a Scientific Consensus Statement that concludes that carbohydrate quality (Glycemic Index = GI) matters and that the carbohydrates present in different foods affect post-meal blood glucose (sugar) differently, with important health implications.  A calorie isn’t just a calorie.  They also confirmed that there is convincing evidence from a large body of research that low GI/GL diets reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, help control blood glucose in people with diabetes, and may also help with weight management. They recommend including GI and GL in national dietary guidelines and food composition tables, and that packaging labels and symbols on low-GI foods should be considered. They also confirmed low GI measurements complement other ways of characterising carbohydrate foods (such as fiber and whole grain content), and should be considered in the context of an overall …