All posts filed under: Blog Entries

Bad-Better-Best: All About Choices

I’m starting a series of quick posts that cover easy modifications you should consider when eating.  Today’s is one of the simplest.  Choose the right butter! Want more information on WHY you shouldn’t eat butter or margarine, only pasture butter or ghee?   Check out my update on fats:  https://time2thrive.com/2017/11/16/update-on-fats-2017/ It also explains that there are many other good fats, see my posts about fats to see if your choices are among them. *Pasture butter is good for spreading, but ghee is clarified butter, so best for frying, sauteing and high heat applications. Next up:  coffee creamer, the good, bad and ugly  

Organic on the Cheap

So, a lot of people say to me “I just can’t afford organic”.  Besides the rationale I’ve already given in prior posts, (how much do you spend to go out to dinner?  movies? take out?  Why would you balk at spending that same amount on your food, the one thing that can energize and heal you?) here’s a source where you can get stock pantry items CHEAP, shipped right to your house, and save $$ in the process.  Thrive Market is the organic version of Amazon Pantry, and there are lots of other reasons to support it, and no relation to my blog, btw… (already a member?  see bottom of page to get a free maple syrup!) Thrive Market is the first socially conscious online marketplace offering natural/organic products at wholesale prices. For less than $5 a month ($59.95 annually), members can shop 4,000 of the highest quality food, supplements, home, personal care, and beauty products from more than 400 of the best brands on the market, all delivered straight to their doors at 25-50% …

How to survive Holiday Parties

Have you lost weight and want it to stay off? Are you actively trying to lose weight… or, are you a good weight but don’t want the upcoming months, holidays and winter to add on the post-holiday ten pounds? One of the hardest things is dealing with food and social gatherings.   No matter what holidays you celebrate, food is pivotal in all of them.  Here are the guidelines that work well for me. The basic thing to avoid is the one component that makes your insulin shoot up, making you WANT more food:  CARBOHYDRATES! Here’s a good strategy:  Be absolutely sure you eat protein.  Chicken, shrimp, beef, fish, nuts.  Buffets often have smaller portions, so pick your selections so you get your 4 oz. serving by end of night.  EAT FAT.  Yes, I said EAT FAT.  That’s what will satiate you.  So, dips, cheese (if you can tolerate dairy), bacon, dressings that aren’t loaded with sugar.  Fat will make you feel full.  AVOID CARBS AT EVERY TURN.  Put dip on veggies, not crackers.  Skip the …

Wisconsin aims to be first trauma-informed state; seven state agencies lead the way

Originally posted on ACEs Too High:
Here in California, many people think that it’s only liberal Democrats who have a corner on championing the science of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and putting it into practice. That might be because people who use ACEs science don’t expel or suspend students, even if they’re throwing chairs and hurling expletives at the teacher. They ask “What happened to you?” rather than “What’s wrong with you?” as a frame when they create juvenile detention centers where kids don’t fight, reduce visits to emergency departments and shrink teen pregnancy rates….among many other things. Because they do all this and more by abandoning the notion of trying to change people’s behavior by punishing, blaming or shaming them, and instead using understanding, nurturing and healing, some people might think this approach belongs to the purview of one political party. Mmmmmm….Not so fast. To paraphrase Tonette Walker, the First Lady of Wisconsin, married to Republican Governor Scott Walker, who was a GOP presidential candidate in 2016: That’s ridiculous. Her exact words were: “It’s…

What I Did this Summer (err…year)

I suppose as the summer winds down it’s time for me to post, so much has happened since the last time I posted and I’d like to share it with all my followers. My goal when I started this blog was to teach people that food is your fuel, your medicine, and the ONLY way to stay healthy.  Based on the feedback I’ve gotten, I’ve accomplished that, but I wanted to do more. So a year ago on July 1, 2016 I embarked upon getting certified as a health and wellness coach by the Functional Medicine Coaching Academy (which is a partner to the Institute for Functional Medicine). I would love to have my own practice, but I’m not an advanced practice nurse, so that’s out of the question. This was the next best thing. So for the last 12 months I have been in school. Which has caused my blog to go quiet. We had lessons on everything; positive psychology, different food plans, nutrition, motivation, documentation, malpractice, business, toxicity, and the psychology of eating. …

Low Carb Shepherd’s Pie

I am fortunate to have a spouse who has been willing to “eat clean” the way I need to.  This has been a godsend, as I don’t have to come up with two dinners each night!  Last week, we were in a rut of what to do with our grass fed hamburger, and he came up with this, combining an old favorite with new “go to” replacements for our carbs.  Specifically, cauliflower mash for potatoes, and green beans for peas.  It was a hit!  We made a double recipe and then didn’t have to cook for a few nights.  WIN-WIN! Steve’s Low Carb Shepherd’s Pie  (printable copy here) 1 Lbs grass fed ground beef or ground lamb 1 Tbl Oil 2 cloves chopped garlic 1 chopped green onion 1 medium chopped yellow onion 1 Tbl arrowroot (you can use cornstarch, but it adds carbs) 1 tsp Salt ¼ tsp Thyme 1 tsp Pepper (black, or aleppo, both work well) 1 cup Water 1 T organic tomato paste 2 T organic fresh parsley 1 cup steamed …

Chicken Kebabs

Chicken Keema Kebabs Healthy doesn’t have to be bland.  These Pakistani inspired Chicken Kebabs are an example of healthy and delicious.  “Keema” is somewhat of a catch-all in South Asian cooking for most ground meat mixtures. Spices and meats can vary wildly from one keema to the next, and then they can be prepared in many different ways, including stewing, pan frying, or skewering and grilling.  We grill this recipe, but you could also use the broiler or a stove top cast iron grill.  Create your own version by experimenting with spices! Prep Time: 20 Minutes (with 20 more optional for frig/freezer time) Cook Time: 12 Minutes Total Time: approximately 1 hour Yield: 4 kebabs (feeds 2-4 based on side dishes) Ingredients 1 teaspoon cumin seed 1 teaspoon coriander seed 1 pound ground chicken breasts or thighs 2 tablespoons finely grated onion 1½ tablespoons fresh garlic, minced (2 large or 2-4 small cloves) 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 2 teaspoons finely diced Thai green chilies or jalapeno if you can’t find Thai 1 ½ teaspoons …

Low Carb Stuffing

Cauliflower is becoming a miracle vegetable in our house.  We’ve made pizza dough, mashed potatoes, cheese bread and now stuffing out of it!  This recipe is from Delish, a website devoted to recipes.  I have the link at the end, but their site doesn’t include the nutrition info I’ve posted below.  We LOVE this recipe! Ingredients 4 tbsp. butter (preferably pasture butter — butter from grass fed cows) 1 onion, chopped 2 large carrots, peeled and chopped 2 celery stalks, chopped or thinly sliced 1 small head cauliflower, chopped 1 c. chopped mushrooms kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper ¼ c. Freshly Chopped Parsley 2 tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary 1 tbsp. chopped fresh sage or 1 tsp. ground sage ½ c. vegetable or chicken broth (we use chicken) Directions In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter. Add onion, carrot, and celery and sauté until soft, 7 to 8 minutes. Add cauliflower and mushrooms and season with salt and pepper. Cook until tender, 5 to 10 minutes more. Add parsley, rosemary, and sage and …

T2T Low Carb Crabcakes

I adapted this recipe from one online that used flour.  I’ve substituted the flour with a combo of brown rice flour and almond flour.  You can also use a wheat free flour mix that is premade.  I thought they turned out better than ones made with flour! The most important thing is that you have good crabmeat. If you like spicy, you’ll have to add some cayenne or sriracha.  These are tasty with a lot of flavor, but not spicy. My adult kids voted this for our Thanksgiving night dinner.  They were fabulous!  At 8 gm net carbs and 19 of protein, these are a nutrition packed, guilt free entree. See bottom of page for a PRINTABLE recipe. Ingredients: 1 large egg 2½ T olive oil based mayo or your favorite mayo 1½ teaspoons Dijon Mustard 1 T Worcestershire Sauce 2 teaspoons Old Bay Seasoning ¼ teaspoon salt 1 stalk celery finely diced 2 T finely chopped fresh parsley 1 lb. lump crabmeat, drained well if you use canned ¼ cup blanched almond flour* ¼ …

Illness and Childhood Trauma

Make sure you tell your physician if you’ve had childhood trauma. Ongoing adversity in childhood leads to a chronic state of “fight, flight or freeze.” Researchers at Yale recently demonstrated that when inflammatory stress hormones flood a child’s body and brain, they alter the genes that oversee our stress reactivity, re-setting the stress response to “high” for life. This increases the risk of inflammation, which manifests later in cancer, heart disease, and other autoimmune diseases, and often death decades earlier than our non-traumatized counterparts. Donna Jackson Nakazawa has studied autoimmune illness and chronic illness extensively, partly because of her own history.  She also wrote the book “The Auto-Immune Epidemic” which helped me understand my mercury toxicity much better. This new study on traumatic childhood experiences is groundbreaking and every doctor should add the questions about childhood trauma to their initial intake/history. This blog post I’m linking to below shows the power of functional medicine and intelligent questioning.  Instead of writing more of a post, I am choosing to share it in it’s entirety.  Please take …

T2T’s Falafel

This is absolutely my take on falafel.  Falafel is a vegetarian patty originally made with either chickpeas, fava beans or a combination of both.  Mine is made with chickpeas and is gluten free. Falafel has been around for centuries, and with good reason.  High in protein and economical to make, falafel is a great staple to add to your culinary arsenal.  Yes, it has carbs, but is high in fiber, and has tons of good vitamins and minerals, especially if you use fresh spices. Common in the middle east, falafel is now international, and can be found in almost any major city in all countries.  Note you have to soak beans overnight, so start this a day ahead.  And don’t think you can used canned ones, it will not work… T2T’s Falafel see below for nutrition info 2 cups dried chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans) ¼ cup fresh flat leaf parsley, stems removed ¼ cup fresh cilantro (if you hate cilantro, skip it and double the parsley) ¼ cup fresh mint leaves 3 cloves …